Teach Your Kids About Money…Plus, A Free Online Tool To Help!

my job chart

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Learning how to handle money is one of the most important lessons we can pass along to our children…and experts say “the sooner, the better.”

Linda Descano, President and CEO of Women & Co., a service of Citibank gives these…

5 tips for teaching kids about money:

1) Treat everyday activities as teachable moments: For instance, during an errand to the grocery store, you can show children how to plan for purchases, make price comparisons, count money.
2) Show them results: Begin a family fund for a common goal, such as vacation. This allows each member to contribute and get excited about saving.

3) Lead by example: Let your kids watch you paying your bills on time. Save money and demonstrate how you do so. Be a conscious spender.
4) Don’t hide your money mistakes: Most of us have made some. Talk about it and tell your kids how you learned from the mistakes.
5) Allow them to make their own money mistakes: Better now, when the stakes aren’t as high.

And here’s A BONUS TIP from me:

Take advantage of a free online tool called My Job Chart that teaches kids how to SAVE, SHARE, AND SPEND.

my job chart fb

 

It’s the digital age answer to the job chart that has been tacked to the family refrigerator for generations.

 

job charts

 

My Mom had job charts for us, I had job charts for my kids (albeit not as consistently as I should have!). But today’s kids are being raised in a digital world and so an online job chart just makes sense. Plus, it makes it easy for parents to assign chores and makes it more motivating and meaningful for kids to do them.

This is how it works!  (It’s genius!)

 

my job chart

You set up your family at MyJobChart.com. It’s completely free. You assign the jobs and set the rewards.

 

my job chart

Then your kids log in, do the chores, and earn points.

 

my job chart

Kids USE those points to SAVE, GIVE to charity, or BUY REWARDS that you set.

 

my job chart

 

I actually went through and set up some basic chores for both my boys in less than 15 minutes. The program is VERY easy to understand.

In addition to being able to choose from many jobs already listed, you can also easily add your own jobs. It’s completely customizable so you can add jobs that YOUR kids need to do…which helps establish good habits that will last a lifetime!

 

my job chart

 

 

They even have mobile apps that make it EASIER for parents and kids to save, share and spend from anywhere!

Parents can assign chores to their kids and manage rewards on the go…and kids can pull their smartphone out of their pocket, see what they need to accomplish for the day, get it done, and check it off!

 

my job chart

 

 

As a parent I’m grateful for anything that helps make my job easier. My Job Chart is such a great help to teach kids about setting goals and achieving them, which I believe is key in developing motivated, responsible and productive adults.

How to handle money wisely is one of life’s most important lessons and as parents I really believe it’s up to us to teach our kids how to do so.

It isn’t easy and requires persistence, patience and love, but no child should enter adulthood without these skills.

 

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Comments

  1. says

    It is so important for parents to teach their kids about money. My husband and I both wish our parents had taught us more. This looks like a great tool to use with our children in a few years. Thanks for sharing!

  2. says

    I LOVE the idea of teaching kids about money at an early age, and this is such a great tool! My little one is only seven months but it wont be long before we can start! lol

  3. CTY says

    Very interesting–not sure if it would have worked with my guys; you know the whole outta sight, outta mind syndrome.
    Unsure about the points/money earned for chores too. To me chores were a given, the reward is praise & a pat on the back (make a huge deal at first, then taper it off). I think it helps kids do their part because it feels good & is right, not because there are material/point awards at the other end. Kind of like when diapers are left behind. Every parent is super thrilled and makes a really big deal of it–the child feels great about him/herself– but eventually it just becomes the norm.
    Having said that, I have paid my boys for jobs that I considered paying a professional for (or just for taking the load off me); things like getting the garden ready. Naturally, the child’s age comes into play, but who’s to say you can’t hire an assistant while you DIY (little legs as a go’fer for supplies, tools & cleanup). Come to an agreement with the child: job description, length of working time, completion time & stick to it. Naturally, praise & a pat on the back accompany the cash payment.
    Our chore chart days are over– but now that there are grandchildren in the mix, I will be passing on this information.
    Thanx Jillee

  4. says

    I agree that it’s important to teach kids about money and other responsibilities by giving them chores around the house. But I have to say, the thought of doing so with a digital chore chart makes me kinda sad. Why are we so opposed to the simple things in life, like pen and paper, these days? We use a point system with my kids (9 & 6)–they earn points for good behavior and lose them for bad behavior and are given opportunities for exciting experiences to “buy” with their points. And we do it without a computer. Obviously I’m not opposed to technology or I wouldn’t be here reading, much less commenting, on this blog. But I think making it such a vital part of kids’ lives while they’re still learning the importance of chores is a mistake. And the line “your kids can take out their smart phones” made me sick. Kids shouldn’t have cell phones at all, much less smart phones.

    With all that said, I’m not judging, and I’ll be back tomorrow to see what One Good Thing Jillee has.

  5. Roxie says

    Give your children $1.00 and take them to neighborhood garage sales. They will quickly learn the worth of that dollar and why it is necessary to wait for something better and most importantly they will have FUN doing it. Making change is difficult to learn in school, same as being able to tell time. I can guarantee it will not be a problem if you do this.

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