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How To Make Sweet and Spicy Candied Ginger

Candied Ginger

Ginger root is well-known as a mainstay ingredient in many Asian cuisines, but there’s so much more to know and love about it! This knobby root has been used for centuries to treat common ailments, and it’s still a popular treatment for digestive issues today. I don’t make a lot of Asian dishes at home, so I was curious if there were other ways to take advantage of the benefits and flavor of ginger.

For some people, consuming ginger is as simple as cutting off a small chunk of the root and chewing on it – raw! But for many of us, raw ginger is just too intense! But don’t despair, because there’s a simple way to turn that overwhelming raw ginger root into pieces of sweet and spicy chewy goodness. Just whip up a batch of homemade candied ginger!

Candied Ginger

Candied ginger is very versatile, and can be used for a lot more than just taming tummy troubles. (Though it is great for that too! It’s a very popular road trip snack for people who tend to get car sick.) Chopped candied ginger can be folded into all sorts of baked goods, like muffins, brownies, and cakes, to add a warm and spicy flavor. Here’s how to make your own candied ginger at home.

Candied Ginger

Candied Ginger

from FoodNetwork.com

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. fresh ginger root
  • 5 cups water
  • 1 lb. granulated sugar (approximately)

Equipment:

Candied Ginger

Directions:

Line your sheet pan with parchment paper, then spray your cooling rack with non-stick spray and set the cooling rack on the sheet pan.

Candied Ginger

Peel the ginger and slice it into 1/8-inch slices using a mandolin or a sharp knife.

Candied Ginger

Place the ginger into a saucepan with 5 cups of water, place it on the stove over medium-high heat. Cover the saucepan and cook the ginger for 35 minutes, or until the ginger is tender.

Candied Ginger

Transfer the ginger to a colander to drain, reserving 1/4 cup of the ginger-infused water.

Candied Ginger

Weigh the drained ginger using your kitchen scale, then measure out the same amount of weight in granulated sugar. Return the ginger to your saucepan, along with the sugar you measured out and the 1/4 cup of ginger water.

Candied Ginger

Set the saucepan over medium-high heat again, and bring it to a boil, stirring frequently. Reduce the heat to medium and cook until the sugar syrup has almost evaporated, and the sugar begins to recrystallize (about 20 minutes or so.)

Candied Ginger

Transfer the ginger immediately to your cooling rack, and spread it out into individual pieces using a spatula or pair of tongs.

Candied Ginger

Once the pieces are completely cool, store your candied ginger in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

Candied Ginger

As for the sugar that has dropped onto the sheet pan, don’t toss it out! Use that ginger-y sugar as a topping for ginger snap cookies, ice cream, or even to sweeten your morning cup of coffee. Yum! Just peel the dried sugar pieces off of the parchment paper, give them a whirl in food processor, and store in an airtight container.

Candied Ginger

Jill Nystul Photo

Jill Nystul (aka Jillee)

Jill Nystul is an accomplished writer and author who founded the blog One Good Thing by Jillee in 2011. With over 30 years of experience in homemaking, she has become a trusted resource for contemporary homemakers by offering practical solutions to everyday household challenges.
I share creative homemaking and lifestyle solutions that make your life easier and more enjoyable!

About Jillee

Jill Nystul

Jill’s 30 years of homemaking experience, make her the trusted source for practical household solutions.

About Jillee

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  • made this over the weekend and it is delish. Guess what everyone is getting for Christmas.
    I used the other ginger water to make tea. Added some sugar and its great with lemonade or soda water

  • Ginger is also very good for people with cancer to reduce the size of tumors. I’m on chemo and am now eating ginger regularly.
    BTW, ginger is easy to grow, and a beautiful plant. Kinda orchidy!

  • Is there a way to preserve this for longer than two weeks? Can I freeze it? I love the idea of having some around when your tummy isn’t filling well. I would love to know more about growing some indoors as well. Thanks for the information.

  • Wow, interesting. Question, would not adding the sugar change the all natural of the ginger root? It looks so yummy. Thanks to you to JoAnne regarding the tip on how grow ginger.

  • I would imagine that the left over ginger water would make wonderful home made lemonaid or drink as tea! I drink ginger tea all the time for stomach issues!

  • Btw-growing/multiplying ginger indoors or out is SUPER easy too! Basically you just grab a chunk from the grocery store and put it in a pot of dirt!

  • This is interesting. You can actually buy the ginger chew candies at the bigger grocery stores with natural and organic sections. I was able to find some at my work.

  • Peeling the knobby stuff can be frustrating, but the skin is very thin, so using the spoon end of a teaspoon easily removes the peel without wasting any of the root, and keeps the soft, rounded contours of the ginger. I can’t resist buying more than I need when I see lovely fat, fresh ginger in the produce section and now I can make my mother’s favourite sweet. Thank you for the recipe; your daily posts are fun and informative.

  • Thanks for this recipe! I love candied ginger, but we can only get it from the Amish community occasionally, and that is if we drive an hour or so. Sometimes, I find it at TJ Max, but that is again over an hour from my home.
    I use it for tummy problems and to prevent motion sickness when traveling by air or ship.
    Now, I just have to get up the nerve to try my hand at this!

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