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Homemade Teriyaki Jerky In The Oven

Homemade Teriyaki Jerky

One of our family’s favorite snacks to bring along on long car trips is teriyaki jerky! It’s satisfying, doesn’t make a big mess, and everyone loves it. However, it can also be very PRICEY, which is why we tend to save it for special occasions rather than having it as an everyday treat. But I recently came across a great recipe for making beef jerky in your oven, so I HAD to give it a try! As it turns out… making your own jerky at home is super simple! It does take patience though, because it marinates over night and then needs to cook for 4 hours.

So next time your family takes a road trip, a little bit of planning can pay off big time in delicious (and affordable) beef jerky for everyone!

Homemade Teriyaki Jerky

Homemade Teriyaki Jerky

adapted from Saved by Grace

  • 2.5lb lean roast (or London broil)
  • 1-½ C. low-sodium soy sauce
  • ½ C. pineapple juice
  • ½ C. brown sugar
  • 1 Tbsp grated ginger
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 Tbsp toasted sesame oil
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • dash of garlic powder
  • dash of onion powder

When you’re ready to start making your jerky, stick your roast in the freezer for 15-30 minutes for a quick freeze. This will make it much easier to slice into thin pieces! While your meat is in the freezer, combine the soy sauce, pineapple juice, brown sugar, ginger, lemon juice, sesame oil, pepper, and garlic and onion powders in a large bowl and whisk to combine. 

Homemade Teriyaki Jerky

Once your meat has firmed up in the freezer, remove it and trim all the visible fat from the exterior (this will keep your jerky from going rancid.) Slice the roast into thin strips. You’ll want your strips to be pretty thin, but not thin enough that they fall apart. Place the strips into the bowl with your marinade, cover the bowl, and place in the refrigerator overnight. 

Homemade Teriyaki Jerky

The next day, soak a dozen or so skewers in water for a half hour, to prevent them from burning in the oven during the cooking process. When your skewers are ready, drain the marinade off your meat and discard it. 

To prep your oven, position one rack as low as possible, and place a cookie sheet to catch any drippings. Position the other rack at the highest position in your oven, and then preheat your oven preheat to 170 degrees, or to the “Warm” setting if you have one. 

Note: I had originally wondered if I could make this using my food dehydrator, but I found out that unless you have a professional-grade food dehydrator, it probably doesn’t get hot enough to bring the meat up to a safe temperature. So if you’re not sure, better stick with the oven!

Homemade Teriyaki Jerky

Spear your marinated meat strips onto the skewers, so that the pieces are hanging by one end with a couple of inches in between them. I was able to fit about four strips per skewer. 

Homemade Teriyaki Jerky

Then, place the skewers directly onto the top rack in your oven, allowing the meat strips to hang above the cookie sheet. Close the oven door and let the meat cook for 4 to 4.5 hours, depending on how thick your strips are. The jerky is done when it is completely dry, and very firm to the touch. Homemade jerky can be stored in the fridge for about a week.

Homemade Beef Jerky

This jerky is so flavorful! Everyone who tried it said it was up there with the best jerky they’ve ever had. If you or your family are jerky fans, I hope you’ll give it a try!

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  • I never knew how easy it could be to make your own homemade teriyaki jerky. I have a neighbor who loves to eat jerky and this might be a good tip for him to try. Being able to make your own food like this seems like it might help you save money in the long run.

  • We just made this the other day and it’s all gone. I like that I can tweak the ingredients to make it gluten free. Thankfully we have our own beef so the cost is more spread out than buying in the store. Locally, good, organic, gluten free jerky is about $8 for a few ounces so we like that we can make our own cheaply. Kids love it, and Sooo much better for them! Thanks Jillee.

  • For those who need to avoid gluten, wheat free tamari gives you similar flavors. I make jerky using different spice mixes, including different curries and masalas. Since these are so savory, I just leave out the sugar. Yummy!

  • I have made jerky both in the oven and in the dehydrator without a problem. I sent batches to my soldier son in Iraq & Afghanistan. He & his buddies loved it! Love the idea of hanging the meat from skewers! I am going to try your recipe with the venison I have on hand, sounds so good!

  • Do you think it will keep if frozen or vacuum sealed? Any suggestions for long term storage? It’s just hubbie & me now. I know he wouldn’t have any problem eating it all in a week. But, I don’t think that’s a good idea. I would love to have on hand for our impromptu road trips. ;-)

  • This is similar to the “old school” method my Dad used to make beef jerky. He’d put seasoned meat on wire coat hangers and make an aluminum tent to put over top then hang it above the wood burning furnace or fireplace. He did this for over 40 years. His kids and grandkids would scarf the jerky up. It was like gold. :)

  • BRILLIANT! Big savings, less bad chemicals, better product! Pork loin is only 1.99 lb here, today, so crossing fingers that it will work as well. And the skewer technique looks excellent for fruit leather, too!

  • Some asian markets will sell meat thinly sliced for hot pot, pho, or shabu shabu. And you might find pork or lamb too if you like some variety. My family loves jerky too, definitely going to try this one! Looks great!! Thanks for the tutorial :)

  • I just made an Asian style beef jerky this past weekend and there was something missing. Not sure what. This will be my next asian style jerky recipe attempt. I like to make mine with ground beef so I am a bit wary of adding too much liquid although really, it’s just a matter of running the dehydrator a bit longer

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