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World’s Best Whole Grain Pancakes

Whole Grain Pancakes

Studies show that eating whole grains instead of refined grains lowers the risk of many chronic diseases such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes and obesity. Health experts advise that grains should be a part of a healthy diet, and that at least half our grains should be consumed as “whole grains.” Unless you have celiac disease, or some sort of gluten sensitivity, you don’t want to miss out on the health benefits of whole grains. To help you start reaping the benefits of a diet rich in whole grains, we’re sharing this recipe for our favorite whole grain pancakes! Delicious and nutritious! It’s a match made in healthy food heaven!

Kaitlyn writes……..  My husband Erik and I spent this past Christmas with my parents in California. While we were there my mom made us her amazing whole grain pancakes with fresh ground flour. We both went crazy over them! Even dubbing them the “world’s best!” :-) Who knew something healthy could taste so, so good!? Suffice it to say I had to get the recipe from her and now I get to share it with all of you.

See how to make a sweet and savory twist on traditional pancakes in my video at the end of this post!

The Best Whole Grain Pancakes

Whole Grain Flour Blend

This pancake recipe is very basic, but it’s the whole grain flour blend that really sets it apart! The flour is made up of equal parts brown rice, spelt and barley. If you have a high powered blender or grain mill you’ll want to buy whole brown rice, spelt and barley.

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Simply add equal amounts of each grain to your blender or grain mill and grind until smooth. I used my Blendtec and it worked great!

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If you don’t have the ability to grind grains you can buy the flour versions of all those grains and just mix them together. I found brown rice, spelt and barley flour in the organic section of my local grocery store. You can also order them on Amazon if you can’t find them at the grocery store.

You can use this flour blend in place of white flour in most recipes. My mom makes chocolate chip cookies with this blend and they are delicious!

Note: While spelt and barley are lower in gluten than wheat, they are not gluten-free. Do not use this flour blend if you have a gluten intolerance or celiac disease.

The Best Whole Grain Pancakes

World’s Best Whole Grain Pancakes

Ingredients

  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cups whole grain flour
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Directions

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In a medium bowl beat the egg. Add milk and beat until combined.

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Add remaining ingredients and beat until smooth.Let batter rest for a few minutes. It will rise and thicken up a bit.

Whole Grain Pancakes 8

Heat a a large pan with olive oil over medium heat. Use about 1/4 cup batter for each pancake. Cook until golden brown on each side.

Whole Grain Pancakes

Serve immediately with warm maple syrup.

Whole Grain Pancakes

These pancakes also keep well in the fridge for a few days and even taste great cold for an afternoon snack.

Do you have a favorite recipe using whole grains?

A plate of the best pancakes, served with a side of crispy bacon.

WHOLE GRAIN PANCAKES

Jill Nystul
Studies show that eating whole grains instead of refined grains lowers the risk of many chronic diseases such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes and obesity. Health experts advise that grains should be a part of a healthy diet, and that at least half our grains should be consumed as “whole grains.” Unless you have celiac disease, or some sort of gluten sensitivity, you don’t want to miss out on the health benefits of whole grains. To help you start reaping the benefits of a diet rich in whole grains, we’re sharing this recipe for our favorite whole grain pancakes! Delicious and nutritious! It’s a match made in healthy food heaven!
5 from 2 votes
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Course Breakfast
Cuisine American
Servings 4
Calories 309 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cups whole grain flour
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Instructions
 

  • In a medium bowl beat the egg. Add milk and beat until combined.
  • Add remaining ingredients and beat until smooth.Let batter rest for a few minutes. It will rise and thicken up a bit.
  • Heat a a large pan with olive oil over medium heat. Use about 1/4 cup batter for each pancake. Cook until golden brown on each side.
  • Serve immediately with warm maple syrup.

Notes

Note: While spelt and barley are lower in gluten than wheat, they are not gluten-free. Do not use this flour blend if you have a gluten intolerance or celiac disease.

Nutrition

Calories: 309kcalCarbohydrates: 36gProtein: 9gFat: 14gSaturated Fat: 3gCholesterol: 47mgSodium: 478mgPotassium: 363mgFiber: 2gSugar: 6gVitamin A: 160IUCalcium: 143mgIron: 2.1mg

 

YouTube video
My two favorite breakfast items in one delicious dish!

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Jill Nystul (aka Jillee)

Jill Nystul is an accomplished writer and author who founded the blog One Good Thing by Jillee in 2011. With over 30 years of experience in homemaking, she has become a trusted resource for contemporary homemakers by offering practical solutions to everyday household challenges.I share creative homemaking and lifestyle solutions that make your life easier and more enjoyable!

About Jillee

Jill Nystul

Jill’s 30 years of homemaking experience, make her the trusted source for practical household solutions.

About Jillee

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Food & Recipes

  • Made these this morning for DH, who is recovering from bad cold, and we loved them! Used coconut oil (for the flavor, whether or not it’s “healthy” and about 2 tablespoons of finely chopped pecans per pancake. Delicious! (And they don’t even have to be drowned in maple syrup to be so…) Next time I might decrease the sugar, mainly because I’m trying to eliminate processed sugar from my diet. But all in all, a keeper!

  • Using coconut oil or avocado oil is healthier to cook with. Leave the olive oil for homemade dressings and other things that don’t require it be heated as it turns to trans fat. Cutting any recipe’s sugar amount in half is always a good idea to decrease your sugar intake as well. Use 100% Grade B maple syrup or local raw honey as syrup as they are chockful of important nutrients :) Use local raw milk and add a big glass of it on the side to round out this meal as it provides even more nutritional benefits as well.

    • Coconut oil would be a good alternative. However, I have never heard that olive oil could change to trans fat. Trans Fat is a completely different kind of fat. Olive oil is widely used in Mediterranean diets, in all sorts of ways. Of course, one should never believe only one source on the web, but here is a link to a reliable study that tells of the many benefits of olive oil and why. I do believe it is a misconception that it is unhealthy if used for frying.
      This is the link;
      http://healthimpactnews.com/2014/myth-buster-olive-oil-is-one-of-the-safest-oils-for-frying-and-cooking

    • I don’t understand why everyone says coconut oil is healthy to cook with. It is all saturated fat. why is it healthy? olive oil and canola oil are unsaturated fats, much healthier than sat fats. it seems to me that using coconut oil is no better than shortening or lard.

      • I read The Coconut Oil Miracle. That was all it took to convince me of how coconut and palm oil were grossly maligned by the soybean industry several decades ago. We’ve been dished up a lot of untruths in America about our food – that coconut oil is bad is another one. Kudos to Bruce Fife for his painstaking research and determination to uncover the truth.

  • Even those of us with celiac disease or gluten intolerance can benefit from “whole grain” by using flours that are higher in fiber. I generally bake with a combination of brown rice flour and rice flour. When I buy gluten free bread, I make sure each serving has as least 2 grams of fiber.

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