How To Make Utah Scones {or Fry Bread} In Honor Of “Swiss Days!”

Swiss Days Scones

Here’s a crazy little fact for you……it took me longer to write the TITLE for today’s post than it did to put the whole thing together! Why? Well, basically it boils down to whether you consider the picture above to be “scones,” a “sopapillas,” or “fry bread.” Confused? Me too. I’ll let Kaitlyn attempt to explain. :-)

Kaitlyn writes………..    Every Labor Day weekend the population of the quaint little Heber Valley that I call home nearly doubles or triples in size. This mass influx of people is due to a wildly popular festival called Swiss Days that takes place in Midway, Utah. I had actually never heard of it before I moved here, but Jillee told me that her family used to come up to Midway from California every year just to go to Swiss Days! Back in 2012, Jillee did a post documenting some of the fantastic crafters that sell every kind of homemade item you can imagine at the festival.

Although the craft booths and cultural events are a huge part of Swiss Days, one of the biggest draws is the food. And for MANY people it’s all about the scones. I’m sure when you hear the word “scone” you think of the crumbly, biscuit variety that can be tricky to make. But in Utah we do scones differently.

Utah scones are more like Navajo fry bread or Sopapillas….perfectly fried pieces of light and airy dough topped with butter and honey or turned into a “Swiss taco.” Nobody really seems to know how these came to be called scones in Utah, and I’m pretty sure you wouldn’t be able to find a Swiss Taco anywhere in Switzerland. ;) But regardless, people come from far and wide for this tasty treat.

Since most of you probably won’t be able to make it to Midway this weekend to try one for yourself, today I’m sharing a simple recipe so you can make them at home! I promise you won’t be disappointed!

Swiss Days Scones

Swiss Days Scones

adapted from Emily Can Cook

Makes about 15 large scones

  • 4 cups flour
  • 1 cup powdered milk
  • 2 cups warm water
  • 8 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • Canola or vegetable oil for frying

Start by heating your oil. I have this fantastic little fryer that I found on Amazon. (Click here if you’re in the market for one.)  I very rarely deep fry anything at home – in fact this is only the second time I’ve used it since Christmas. But it’s super convenient for times like this. My fryer recommends an oil temperature of 375 degrees for pastries. If you’re using a stock pot for frying you can measure the temperature with a food thermometer or test it with a small piece of dough. When you drop dough into the oil it should sizzle and float right to the surface.

Swiss Days Scones

Mix the dried milk and warm water together  in a small bowl.

Swiss Days Scones

Mix the flour, salt and baking powder together in a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer. I used my Kitchenaid mixer with the paddle attachment but I think you could do this in a bowl with a hand mixer as well. Turn your mixer on a low-medium setting and slowly add the milk mixture until everything is well incorporated.

Swiss Days Scones

Put golf ball-sized piece of dough (depending on how big you want your scones) on a cutting board sprinkled with flour. Roll the dough out into a large oval until it’s about 1/4 inch thick. Don’t worry about getting a perfect circle or if the dough tears a bit! These scones are meant to look rustic and imperfect.

Swiss Days Scones

Cut three slits in the dough to prevent air pockets forming while frying.

Swiss Days Scones

I tried one scone without slits just to see what would happen and this was the result…

Swiss Days Scones

…a scone with a big 0l’ bubble in the middle that didn’t cook evenly.

You can fry your scones one or two at a time depending on the size of your fryer or pot. I decided to stick to one at a time. Fry them until they are golden brown on both sides then drain on paper towels. I actually overcooked a few of mine and they still tasted fine. They are hard to mess up!

Swiss Days Scones

I am dying to try these scones with some of Jillee’s Homemade Honey Butter Ambrosia but I didn’t have any on hand. So I topped them with butter and plenty of honey. You can reheat them but they definitely taste the best right out of the fryer!

Swiss Days Scones

Another one of my favorite ways to eat Utah scones is Navajo Taco Style – pile them up with ground beef, refried beans, lettuce, cheese and plenty of fresh salsa. Yum!

How do you do scones in your house?

Swiss Days Scones

Fried Swiss Days scones on a plate with butter and syrup.

SWISS DAYS SCONES

Jill Nystul
Here’s a crazy little fact for you……it took me longer to write the TITLE for today’s post than it did to put the whole thing together! Why? Well, basically it boils down to whether you consider the picture above to be “scones,” a “sopapillas,” or “fry bread.” Confused? Me too. I’ll let Kaitlyn attempt to explain. :-) Kaitlyn writes……….. Every Labor Day weekend the population of the quaint little Heber Valley that I call home nearly doubles or triples in size. This mass influx of people is due to a wildly popular festival called Swiss Days that takes place in Midway, Utah. I had actually never heard of it before I moved here, but Jillee told me that her family used to come up to Midway from California every year just to go to Swiss Days! Back in 2012, Jillee did a post documenting some of the fantastic crafters that sell every kind of homemade item you can imagine at the festival.
3.67 from 3 votes
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Course Appetizer, Side Dish
Cuisine American
Servings 8
Calories 310 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 4 cups Flour
  • 1 cup Dried milk
  • 2 cups Warm water
  • 8 teaspoons Baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons Salt
  • Vegetable oil for frying

Instructions
 

  • Start by heating your oil.
  • Mix the dried milk and warm water together in a small bowl.
  • Mix the flour, salt and baking powder together in a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer.
  • Turn your mixer on a low-medium setting and slowly add the milk mixture until everything is well incorporated.
  • Put a golf ball-sized piece of dough (depending on how big you want your scones) on a cutting board sprinkled with flour. Roll the dough out into a large oval until it’s about an 1/8th of an inch thick.
  • Cut three slits in the dough to prevent air pockets forming while frying.
  • Fry your dough until golden brown on both sides then drain on paper towels.
  • Serve with toppings of choice!

Nutrition

Calories: 310kcalCarbohydrates: 55gProtein: 10gFat: 4gSaturated Fat: 2gCholesterol: 15mgSodium: 648mgPotassium: 683mgFiber: 1gSugar: 6gVitamin A: 150IUVitamin C: 1.4mgCalcium: 330mgIron: 3.3mg

Read This Next


Jill Nystul Photo

Jill Nystul (aka Jillee)

Jill Nystul is an accomplished writer and author who founded the blog One Good Thing by Jillee in 2011. With over 30 years of experience in homemaking, she has become a trusted resource for contemporary homemakers by offering practical solutions to everyday household challenges.I share creative homemaking and lifestyle solutions that make your life easier and more enjoyable!

About Jillee

Jill Nystul

Jill’s 30 years of homemaking experience, make her the trusted source for practical household solutions.

About Jillee

MORE IDEAS FROM

Food & Recipes

  • Would this recipe work if I omitted the powdered milk and used 1 cup of milk to replace the water? Like masa, powdered milk where I live only comes in large packages and I don’t use either of them enough to warrant the waste.

    • Yes, just follow these directions. For every 1/4 cup of milk powder, substitute 1 cup of regular milk. You’ll also want to reduce the original amount of water called for in the recipe by 1 cup.

      Whole fat, reduced fat, and nonfat milk can all be used in place of milk powder. Just note that the higher the fat content of the milk, the creamier and richer the final product will be.

  • Thank you for the great recipe! My son wanted me to run to Wal-Mart, spend his birthday gift card on a deep fryer and make these. We just did and love them-sprinkled in cinnamon sugar.
    Now we are looking for other varieties of the batter.

    Awesome!

  • Often, things go wrong during repossessions and it’s important
    for professionals to protect themselves on this dangerous job.
    If your vehicle needs to be towed, call one of
    the towers affiliated with your insurers and arrange it yourself.

    It often means that your website wasn’t what they expected, or had something that scared
    them into clicking the dreaded Back button on their browser.

  • Thank you. As a child, my grandfather took me fishing at Fish Lake in central Utah and in a diner in Koosharum (spelling ?) I had scones. When I returned to Las Vegas, every scone I ordered was never the same. When I discovered beignets, I was closer. Thank you to I think I have found my childhood treat!

  • The reason the recipe includes powdered milk is because this dough originally came from the reservations and the Native American women who made the bread had to use what was available to them and fresh milk was hard to come by.

  • I used to buy these every year at the Texas State Fair (called funnel cakes, because they thin the batter and drop it through a funnel into the fat), along with freshly dipped and fried corny dogs. Now that I’m allergic to wheat and corn, I miss them terribly! Wonder if a wheat-free flour would work … hmmm.

  • I am not meaning to start anything but I am offended enough to say something. Please do not be mean in response.
    Fry bread was made by the Native Americans when they were contained on reservations by the people who “discovered America” (yes, there is a bit if sarcasm in that quote). The Native Americans were given land that had nothing to live off of. They were used to a migraition way of life, with the ability to find food when it was in season. With that no longer a possibility the new American government gave them, ever so generously, flour, dry milk and lard to live on (they also gave them disease laiden blankets, but I digress). So this where I am offended. The cutes-a-fying of this by re-naming it “Utah Scones”. I don’t want to stop thinking fry bread is delish, it is, I want you to think about where and why fry bread comes from. Have some reverence, some respect, for those amazing people who figured out how to make do with so little.
    Please look into the Native people of this land. Please know they still exist, silently, among us. That they get called names and mistook for other races of people. Let us show them the respect they deserve.
    Thank you for your time.

  • I am from the east coast (recently imported to S. Calif) where scones are the traditional English type and these fry breads would be called zeppolis. They become funnel cake (the batter is thinned to pancake consistency) when poured in overlapping random squiggles into hot oil in a round skillet from a funnel pitcher (fried until golden & flipped all at once with a fork). Once when my son came home from a YSA activity he brought home the leftover “scones”. One look & I said these aren’t scones they’re zeppolis. He said, “Not when you are from Utah”.

  • Hi everyone. I live in Oregon and we call them “elephant ears” as well, which can be found at just about all the different festivals around. SUPER YUM WITH CINNAMON SUGAR……………..

  • We make something similar down in Louisiana. Our recipe is a little different: 2 cups of all purp. flour, 2 tsp. baking soda, 2 tsp. sugar, pinch of salt, 1 1/4 cup of water. You also make a ball and dip in flour but we make a hole in the middle before we fry it…sort of like a donut and we call them crackerjacks.

  • Some of my fondest memories of living in Phoenix in the 1980s was a little place that made Navajo Fry bread and Navajo Tacos. I’m quite sure they were fried in lard, though – which gave them an extra special yummy flavor.

    I’m thinking there must be a similar traditional break here in Ecuador. The empanada dough is probably very close.

    Fry bread… guess I’ll have to indulge. Thanks.

  • Hi Jill,
    I wrote you about a week ago concerning my order of your book, “JillyBean and the One Good Thing” ordered through your blog post. My order was placed on May 13, 2014, and I paid with PayPal. The book was to be sent to my granddaughter in Australia. To date, it has not been received. I am hoping you can let me know if the books purchased during your pre-sale offer have been sent out through the mail.
    My granddaughter is moving. If the books have not been sent out yet, I would like to change the delivery address. If so, I would appreciate your assistance in the matter. Thank you.

    Susan Cuss

  • My family calls these dough dogs :) They are our the breakfast of choice when we are camping. Especially with grandmas’ wild raspberry jam or my dad’s fresh maple syrup!!!

  • How fun! I will definitely be making these! I grew up next door in Idaho and my husbad is actually from Heber City. My mom used to save pices of dough from when she made bread. She would fry it and we would put butter and sometimes cinnamon sugar on it. We calleditfry bread. Now when I am in the mood for scones, I buy a package of refrigerated biscuits, stretch them out a bit and fry them. They are the best with butter and honey. Glad to have a version that is healthier and more cost effective.

  • These look yummy. Growing up in Denver we had a Mexican restaurant that was famous for its sopapillas. It’s, kind of funny, living in Missouri now when I order one it’s nothing like the ones in Denver. I’m going to have fun trying this out.

  • These are very similar to Zeppolis (Italian) and they are found at lots of New York Street Festivals. And they’re also the same dough as for funnel cakes! The only difference is on the East Coast, they (both the Zeppolis and the Funnel Cakes) are sprinkled with powdered sugar. Yum.
    And I agree with Liz – why not just use skim (or fat-free) milk?

    • That’s what I was thinking– we have an Italian Festival in my town and I LOVE the fried dough there… sprinkled with powdered sugar and soo yummy! :)

      • I’m from the East Coast as well and we always called it fried dough. You can get it with sprinkled sugar, sometimes cinnamon and sugar or a little sweet tomato sauce (my favorite). I always looked forward to the Italian festival and fair season to get fried dough….mmmm

  • These sound great. My question is why powdered milk and water? Can I use regular milk instead? Thanks for all the wonderful tips and ideas you guys come up with :)

  • >