7 More Of The Most Useful Things You Can Do With Rubbing Alcohol

Rubbing Alcohol

Useful Things You Can Do With Rubbing Alcohol

Back in June, I wrote a post about some of the highly useful things you can do with rubbing alcohol. (If you missed it, you can check it out at the link below!) That post got a lot of positive feedback, which I was thrilled about! It’s always nice to know that other people find tips like these to be as useful as I do. But the thing about rubbing alcohol in particular is that there are so many great uses for it, I couldn’t fit them all in one blog post! So today I’ll be doing a Part 2 of sorts, and sharing 7 more practical ways to use rubbing alcohol.

Related: 11 Of The Most Useful Things You Can Do With Rubbing Alcohol

If you know of any brilliant ways to use rubbing alcohol that aren’t listed here or in the post I linked to above, I’d love to hear about them! Leave your brilliant ideas in a comment at the bottom of this post, so we can keep chatting about it. :-)

Check out how to painlessly unstick a bandaid in my video below!

Rubbing Alcohol

1. Make An Ice Pack

You can use rubbing alcohol and water to make a shapeable, moldable ice pack. The alcohol prevents the water from freezing completely, so you can form the ice pack around your leg, arm, neck, or wherever you’re experiencing aches and pains. Get the full instructions at the link below!

Related: How To Make Your Own Shapeable Ice Pack For Pennies!

Rubbing Alcohol

2. Clean Your Glasses

Sick of all those smudges on the lenses of your reading glasses and sunglasses? You can make an effective glasses cleaning spray at home using just three ingredients! It works like a charm when used with a microfiber cloth, and you’ll save yourself the trouble of buying an expensive store-bought cleaning solution. Get the recipe at the link below.

Related: How To Make A Simple And Effective Eyeglass Cleaner In Seconds

Rubbing Alcohol

3. Remove A Bandaid

If a bandaid isn’t coming off easily, grab a bottle of rubbing alcohol. Saturate the adhesive ends of the bandaid with alcohol and let soak in for a few seconds. The alcohol will help dissolve the adhesive, so you can pull the bandaid off pain-free!

YouTube video
Take it from someone who uses a lot of bandaids, this trick works wonders.
Rubbing Alcohol

4. Keep Your Shower Clean

Use rubbing alcohol to make a daily cleaning spray that will keep your shower cleaner for longer! Along with a bit of dish soap, some peroxide, and some dishwasher rinse aid, rubbing alcohol will help prevent soap scum from settling on the walls of your shower. Less soap scum will build up over time, resulting in less shower scrubbing for you! Get the recipe at the link below.

Related: This One Simple Thing Will Keep Your Shower Cleaner, Longer

Rubbing Alcohol

5. Remove Print From Containers

I always like to find ways to reuse things if I can. One of those items is plastic containers, like the ones that sour cream and yogurt come in. I like to remove the ink print from the outside so they look a little neater, and I use rubbing alcohol to do it! Just use a cotton pad and some rubbing alcohol, and the print will come right off. Check out some great ways to reuse these containers at the link below!

Related: How To Repurpose Plastic Containers Using This Quick And Easy Trick

Rubbing Alcohol

6. Erase Scuff Marks

If you have scuff marks on your floors and baseboards, don’t spend hours scrubbing! Just grab your trusty bottle of rubbing alcohol. You’ll be surprised at how easily the alcohol dissolves the stubborn scuff marks!

Rubbing Alcohol

7. Wipe Away Grease

Use rubbing alcohol to wipe away grease buildup on your stove or microwave. Just dampen a microfiber cloth with rubbing alcohol and buff it to a shine!!

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Jill Nystul (aka Jillee)

Jill Nystul is an accomplished writer and author who founded the blog One Good Thing by Jillee in 2011. With over 30 years of experience in homemaking, she has become a trusted resource for contemporary homemakers by offering practical solutions to everyday household challenges.I share creative homemaking and lifestyle solutions that make your life easier and more enjoyable!

About Jillee

Jill Nystul

Jill’s 30 years of homemaking experience, make her the trusted source for practical household solutions.

About Jillee

MORE IDEAS FROM

Bright Ideas

  • Spraying Rubbing Alcohol on a head full of lice will kill the crawlies. Once that’s applied, saturate the hair with any cheap cooking oil. This loosens the eggs. Comb out with a nit comb. (Sleeping overnight with the oil will only help, if you have a shower cap and/or beanie to encase the hair and an old towel on the pillow slip just incase). Wash the hair thoroughly, this may take 2-3 shampoo’s to remove the oil and condition. Section off the wet hair and use a straightening iron on each section, with a comb at the scalp as a burn barrier. This last part will kill (heat on wet hair) anything remaining.

  • My Mom taught me to grab a bit of TP dipped in rubbing alcohol to wipe the guest bathroom’s sink and fixtures right before company comes. It takes 30 seconds and makes a good impression when you don’t have time to do a major clean.

  • I love this site! I would like to find a really good floor cleaner. The only thing I would complain about is I have to go through everything to find out if it’s mentioned in any of the sections

  • Hi! If I missed this one I apologize :)!!
    You can use rubbing alcohol to ease nausea, very helpful for pregnant women. As a nurse I have acces to alcohol swabs, we take one swab and put it across bridge of nose. Can probably use any tissue paper or paper towel squeeze excess off, lay across nose. Open pores to increase oxygen intake, kind of gets rid of bad smells around you (except swab of course). Usually only put on for a minute or two.

  • I’m surprised this hasn’t been mentioned yet, but if you’re painting a room (indoor latex paint) and you notice a drip on your hard floors – even if it’s bone dry or a week old, a little puddle of rubbing alcohol makes it come right off. This saved me when I had an unnoticed hole in my dropcloth.

  • “The alcohol will help dissolve the [bandaid] adhesive, so you can pull the bandaid off pain-free!” Except, of course, for the pain of alcohol touching a wound that isn’t completely healed.

  • I use it as an air disinfectant, instead of Lysol spray. Be careful around wood furniture. It’ll strip the finish off. If there’s an infectious disease going around my house, I’ll spray the sheets and pillowcases several times a day before wash day.

  • Thanks to a previous post about bungee cords, I hang my rolls of wrapping paper across a window in my craft room. Makes it pretty, very quick to local the right roll, and up and out of the way. The old trash can filled with paper rolls that was taking up space in the corner is now gone! I didn’t use bungee cords but cheap curtain clips that went over a long cheap narrow rod that squeezed between the window jams. Perfect use, easy, and fun. Thanks so much for the inspiration. Those rolls of paper are now being used as they are being seen frequently.

    • Yes, I ruined a pair the first time I used it because I had an anti-reflective coating on it. It didn’t just take the coating off, it clouded up the lenses. I was at work. Bad experience. Luckily I wasn’t as vision-impaired back then as I am now. LOL!

  • Be careful using alcohol on eyeglass lenses if you have any special coatings. My optometrist office told me not to use anything with alcohol because it would ruin the non-glare coating. They said to wash with mild soap and water. The microfiber cloth is good, though.

  • Those are some very clever ideas. I have a couple of “old-fashioned” ones: have muscle/joint pain – rub the area with rubbing alcohol; use a mixture of tepid water and rubbing alcohol to reduce a high fever by lightly “bathing” the area; have bruises – rubbing alcohol; for your garden – effective weed killer; soaking your feet will not only kill fungus but if your feet are especially tired, a good soak in rubbing alcohol and water helps.

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