· Holidays · Halloween · Spooky Floating Cheesecloth Ghost – So Easy & Adorable You Simply Can’t Resist
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Spooky Floating Cheesecloth Ghost – So Easy & Adorable You Simply Can’t Resist

Cheesecloth Ghost

Let me just start out by saying I am not much of a Halloween decorator. But when I came across this idea for making a spooky ghost out of cheesecloth, I simply could not resist trying to make one! I say TRYING because I wasn’t entirely sure I could pull it off. You know me, I tend to stick to very simple crafts and projects.

But it turns out that this project is SO easy even 1st graders make them in school! All you need is some cheesecloth and liquid starch! Everything else you probably have at home. Here’s how you can make your own Spooky Cheesecloth Ghost to add a little Halloween fun to your house!

Cheesecloth Ghost

Spooky Cheesecloth Ghost

Supplies:

Cheesecloth Ghost

Directions:

Take your round object (I used a mini pumpkin) and position it on top of the opening of the glass. It should balance there without too many issues, but if it’s giving you trouble, you could always tape it to the bottle for added stability.

Cheesecloth Ghost

Now that your ghost form is ready, it’s time to make a ghost! Start by cutting a piece of cheesecloth in half.

Cheesecloth Ghost

Take one piece of the cheesecloth and fold it in half, then drape it over the form. Make any adjustments you might want to get the perfect ghostly figure.

Cheesecloth Ghost

If you want your ghost to be able to stand freely when it’s done, make sure to puddle some of the cheesecloth at the bottom to give it something to “stand” on. If you’ll be hanging your ghost, it’s not necessary.

Cheesecloth Ghost

Once the cheesecloth is arranged to your liking, take your spray starch and give the cheesecloth a good soaking. Once the starch has dried, check to see if the cheesecloth is properly stiff. If it’s not quite there, spray another coat of starch.

Cheesecloth Ghost

Once your ghost is properly stiff, remove the cheesecloth from the form, and add a pair of eyes and a mouth, if desired. Black paper, black felt, or a black marker are all perfectly good choices for ghost faces. Or you could go the silly route and use some googly eyes! :-) We ultimately decided to make this more of a cute ghost than a spooky one. That’s the fun part of this project – you can make any kind of ghost you want!

Make A Floating Cheesecloth Ghost

Back when I first did this project, I hung my little ghosty from the ceiling fan in our living room. Instant flying ghost! Now I’m thinking it would be even MORE fun to make 2 or 3 of them, attach them to the blades of your ceiling fan for a ghostly parade!

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Jill Nystul (aka Jillee)

Jill Nystul is an accomplished writer and author who founded the blog One Good Thing by Jillee in 2011. With over 30 years of experience in homemaking, she has become a trusted resource for contemporary homemakers by offering practical solutions to everyday household challenges.I share creative homemaking and lifestyle solutions that make your life easier and more enjoyable!

About Jillee

Jill Nystul

Jill’s 30 years of homemaking experience, make her the trusted source for practical household solutions.

About Jillee

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  • I love the lotion recipe using coconut oil, etc. but would like your recommendation oon how many ounces of baby lotion to use with 1 c. Coconut oil and 8 oz. Vit. E. Cream? I used 15oz. And wonder if that is sufficient.

    Thanks.

  • How long does it take for the starch to dry? I am planning on making this with a group of girls but am not sure how long we’ll have to wait until the form is stiff to remove it from the glass/pumpkin form.

  • Love this site, just wondering if you might have a recipe for a good pet shampoo for dogs to clear up a rash. Something that is not made with a lot of chemicals. Hope you can help. Thank you C. Ochoa

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