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Making Homemade Mayo {Regular and Vegan}

homemade mayo

Making mayonnaise is not something I do on a regular basis, but every time I make it, I ask myself why I DON’T do it on a regular basis! Making your own mayonnaise in the blender is super simple, and can save you a lot of money in the long run! Once you have all the necessary ingredients, you will be able to make batch after batch of the stuff.

Plus, you know exactly what’s going into it. While the store bought stuff is convenient and cheap, most of it contains hydrogenated soybean oil (which has been called one of the most harmful ingredients in processed foods – along with high fructose corn syrup) and preservatives. Homemade mayo on the other hand is packed with protein and good fats, and tastes WAY better than store-bought!

Here’s how you do it:

homemade mayo

Homemade Mayo

  • 2 egg yolks
  • 2 tsp white wine vinegar
  • ½ tsp Dijon mustard
  • ¼ tsp kosher salt
  • ¾ C light olive oil*
homemade mayo
homemade mayo

Directions:

To make regular mayonnaise, add the first 4 ingredients to your blender and start it on low. Then, pour the oil into the blender SLOWLY while it blends, allowing the mixture to emulsify. Once the mixture has reached the desired thickness, you’re done! Easy as that. :-)

Note: Raw eggs should not be used in food prepared for pregnant women, babies, young children, the elderly, or anyone whose health is compromised.

If you’re allergic to eggs, a vegan, or you just can’t deal with the idea of eating raw eggs, you’re in luck! Here’s a recipe for making a great dairy-free mayo, for a fraction of the cost of the expensive dairy-free options in the store!

homemade mayo

Homemade Vegan Mayo

  • ½ C unsweetened soy milk
  • 2 tsp ACV
  • ½ tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp agave nectar
  • ¼ tsp ground mustard
  • 1 C light olive oil*
homemade mayo
homemade mayo

Directions:

To make this vegan mayonnaise, add the soy milk to your blender and start it on low. Stream in the oil very slowly, and I mean VERY SLOWLY. The soy milk is acting as the emulsifier instead of egg yolks in this recipe, but the process just takes a little longer.

After all the oil has been added, stop the blender and add the rest of the ingredients. Continue to blend on low for a few more minutes to let the mixture thicken. If you want, you can put your dairy-free mayo in the fridge for a couple of hours after making it to help it “set up” a little more.

So there you have it! Now that you’ve seen how easy it is to make your own standard or dairy-free mayo, I hope you’ll give it a try!!

* Both recipes originally called for canola oil. I chose to use light olive oil instead because it is less processed, but really any light oil will work here.

homemade mayo

Now that I’ve reminded myself of how GREAT it is to make your own, I don’t think I’ll be BUYING any mayo for a very long time.

homemade mayo

HOMEMADE MAYONNAISE

Jill Nystul
Making mayonnaise is not something I do on a regular basis, but every time I make it, I ask myself why I DON’T do it on a regular basis! Making your own mayonnaise in the blender is super simple, and can save you a lot of money in the long run! Once you have all the necessary ingredients, you will be able to make batch after batch of the stuff. Plus, you know exactly what’s going into it. While the store bought stuff is convenient and cheap, most of it contains hydrogenated soybean oil (which has been called one of the most harmful ingredients in processed foods – along with high fructose corn syrup) and preservatives. Homemade mayo on the other hand is packed with protein and good fats, and tastes WAY better than store-bought!
Prep Time 10 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Course Condiment
Cuisine American
Calories 1977 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • ½ C Soy milk unsweetened
  • 2 tsp ACV
  • ½ tsp Kosher salt
  • ½ tsp Agave nectar
  • ¼ tsp Ground mustard
  • 1 C Olive oil Light

Instructions
 

  • Add soy milk to a blender and start on low.
  • Stream in the oil very slowly, then stop the blender.
  • Add the vinegar, salt, agave nectar, and mustard.
  • Continue to blend on low for several minutes until the mixture thickens.

Notes

Note: Raw eggs should not be used in food prepared for pregnant women, babies, young children, the elderly, or anyone whose health is compromised.

Nutrition

Calories: 1977kcalCarbohydrates: 6gProtein: 3gFat: 218gSaturated Fat: 30gSodium: 1226mgPotassium: 166mgSugar: 5gVitamin A: 465IUVitamin C: 8.5mgCalcium: 165mgIron: 1.8mg
Vegan Mayonnaise
 
Author: Jillee
Ingredients
  • ½ C unsweetened soy milk
  • 2 tsp ACV
  • ½ tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp agave nectar
  • ¼ tsp ground mustard
  • 1 C light olive oil
Instructions
  1. Add soy milk to a blender and start on low.
  2. Stream in the oil very slowly, then stop the blender.
  3. Add the vinegar, salt, agave nectar, and mustard.
  4. Continue to blend on low for several minutes until the mixture thickens.
 

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  • If you are going for most excellent contents like myself, just go to see this site all the time since it presents feature contents, thanks

  • […] the store bought kind. I’ve found it’s super easy to make in my Blendtec blender with this recipe. If you are watching your fat intake, or don’t like mayonnaise, you can substitute plain […]

  • My grandson made a trip to the ER a few months ago because he had an allergic reaction to soy milk. Who knew? My uncle toured a place where they make salad dressing and they said it was at such a ph balance that it does not spoil, you can leave it on the cupboard and not refrigerate. We had a discussion at work and many said their parents never refrigerate it and that it turns darker yellow as it ages. If you get sick on potato salad in the summer and make a trip to the ER they will ask if the dressing was homemade and they will check the contents of your stomach to see if it was in this order the onion or the potatoes. During the plague the nurses and doctors were protected somewhat because they sat onions and garlic cloves around to absorb the bacteria and viruses. Try this during the winter setting them in baskets around the house. I know a beautitician that did this and her employees didn’t experience a cold all winter, but the rest of the family did. Check them weekly, if the virus is there it will be absorbed and the onions will turn black and the garlic will be rubbery. If you use homemade dressing only make what you need for that occasion and keep the salad cold for safety.

    • You mean mayo is at a ph balance it can be left out? My mother used onions sliced in water left in a bowl around the house to absorb smells and I have heard that before about them absorbing bacteria or viruses, I had forgotten about that. Thanks

    • Roxie, do you have to do anything to the onions or garlic first? Do you have to cut them open first or place them out in their natural state (skin/peel on)?

      Thanks. It will be interesting to test this out.

  • I noticed you use white vinegar in one and acv in the other. I also see other types are mentioned by people here. Do you know why each recipe uses the type of vinegar it does and do you have a preference? Also I fully understand adding mustard for flavor (I often use it in place of mayo or mixed with mayo) but it doesn’t work for everything, does the mustard give it a mustard flavor tang or is it critical to the base recipe for some reason? Thank you for sharing these recipes and thank you to the others that shared additional ideas and recipes here too. This looks like such a simple and fantastic idea, making my own mayo and I can’t wait to try it out.

    • Do any of the ingredients here have gluten? I wasn’t thinking so. Jillee knows all about having to contend with that, so many of the things she offers are gluten free and I think she usually goes that route if at all possible since she has a child with a gluten allergy. This has always struck me as a great resource for people who are eating GF and even though I’m fortunate not to need to worry about that, I have enjoyed the education as well as cutting gluten out with her recipes. It may be my ignorance but I thought mayonnaise was gluten free in general so there wouldn’t be any reason for her to mention it. But again I may be all wrong about that.

  • I like to make homemade mayo too and I like to use half melted coconut oil along with olive oil. If you use the deodorized coconut oil, it doesn’t add much “flavor.”

  • Thanks for the recipes. I swap out homemade versions every chance I get and to have a homemade vegan version is even better.
    Wondering if it can be frozen–(we rarely use mayo). I’ll try freezing the vegan recipe & let you know. Figure I’ll use 4 oz canning jars.

  • Jillee, just wondering about adding half the room temperature olive oil, then once that is emulsified, adding the other half with hot olive oil. This might cook the eggs without ruining the texture. I like the idea of cooking the eggs if possible. I’ll give it a try and let you know if it works well.

  • Two minutes with the stick blender. If you do not have light TASTING olive oil, use a good canola oil, or any other for that matter. Strong tasting olive oil is too prevalent in mayo. I only always used 1 egg. The essentials are oil, egg and an acid, other ingredients are add ons. I (usually) vary my acidic between lemon juice, white wine or rice wine vinegar. Just a slight difference in the taste; I tried with malt , apple cider and plain vinegar. Again a matter of taste, all worth trying. I have not bought a jar of mayo in the past 40 years. Started doing it by hand, then blender, food processor and now with the stick blender which is the tops. Never had an incidence of food poisoning. I have done it for the past several years with my egg directly out of the fridge and have never had a miss.

    • Hi Andrea! I haven’t tried it with EVOO but I’ve read in multiple places that the flavor is too strong. Really light olive oil is supposed to be the best thing to use.

  • Can I just omit the prepared ground mustard? Not a fan of it. Or possibly use dry mustard. I don’t want to use something that is already prepared and has preservatives in Homemade product.

    Thanks!

  • For those concerned about raw eggs, you can buy powdered, reconstitute the required amount, and they work just as good :D

    I’ve also seen a mayo recipe with sardines instead of dairy and eggs, if those are a concern and you are not vegan, but I’ve never had a chance to try making it.

    • You can also use Flax Seed as an egg substitute. I haven’t tried it yet but I may do so soon. :) I would also try the coconut milk in place of soy milk in the 2nd recipe. I avoid all things soy like the plague. lol

  • I make mayo like this every week. It is actually even easier if you have an immersion (stick) blender. My recipe is very similar except I use two yolks and one whole egg, dry mustard powder, and lemon juice instead of vinegar. You can also use whey which you can skim off of sour cream or plain yogurt instead of vinegar or lemon. These acids are the “preservative”. Whey mayo can last up to 2 weeks and the vinegar or lemon versions should be used in a week. I make mine in a 10oz canning jar with a wide mouth for my stick blender. The jar has measurements up the sides so I use that. 1 cup light olive oil in first, two yolks and one whole egg, 1Tbls lemon juice, 1/4 tsp mustard powder, and I add a little Morton’s Natures Seasons but salt and pepper would work. The trick with the stick blender is you have to push it to the bottom of the jar and start blending. As the mayo thickens you gradually pull up. Works very fast. Put on the lid and your done.

  • Well I don’t care what you call eggs! I am just excited over a recipe that I can use.
    Being diagnosed with celtics and not eating sugar or diary I am thrilled with your recipes. It has now been 4 weeks since I have changed my eating habits and the first place I ran for recipes was your blog! Thank You for sharing!

    • LOL – I was reading the comments out loud to a friend and we got to yours and cheered!

      Nothing like calling an egg a dairy product to get the Granola Gang in an uproar?

      I don’t care if you call an egg a dairy product or not….I just love mayo!!! Thinking maybe I’ll have to give this a try this weekend. As a diabetic I’m always looking for healthier ways to get to indulge in a little bit of the things I love, without all the added sugars and chemicals!

      I hope you’re feeling better!

      Since I began to cut out artificial and highly processed foods my blood sugars are much improved!

  • Going to try this today. I homeschool my granddaughter, and we always look for good home economics projects to try. She is making a cookbook out of the recipes that she has tried, so this will go in it. Thanks!!

    • Diane, I love the idea of your granddaughter making a cookbook of recipes she’s made. What a great way to remember learning to cook. I might have to borrow your idea with daughter and my sons. We try to cook together regularly but this would serve as great journal too.

  • I make a mayo type dressing using Egg Beaters for safety. It works just great. My recipe is for Cesar Salad Dressing: (omit the anchovies and you have mayo) 1/4 cup. Egg Beaters , 1/4 cup. red wine vinegar, I/2 cup extra light olive oil, 1 tsp. prepared mustard, 1 lg. clove garlic, 1/2 can of anchovies with oil. Blend in blender until very creamy. Put in frig. for at leat 1 hour and it is a creamy mayo consistency. Attendum: I freeze the egg beaters in 1/4 cup amounts and keep in a baggy in freezer for further use. I also bag and freeze the anchovies also. You can use this recipe without the anchovies for mayo alone.

  • Might be interesting to experiment with a small amount of chia seeds for a thickener in the second recipe. Maybe with some of the almond milk since I avoid soy. And pasteurized eggs would be a choice for those concerned about the safety issues of raw eggs.

  • Ehm…Jillee?
    Eggs are not dairy. They are an animal byproduct, but dairy is considered everything that is produced by a mammary gland, i.e. udders.
    Short of a platypus, I cannot think of any animal that lays eggs and produces milk at the same time ;-)
    The second one is simply a vegan recipe. (BTW, I believe that if you stir the second version over a double boiler, it might thicken more quickly? I may be wrong though…)

    That said, THANKS for the recipe, I’ll try it for my mom’s birthday brunch on Saturday!

    • I plan to try it with almond milk. I am hoping it works. I know that soy milk thickens better when it calls for the milk to thicken in some way, so that might be the reason it was chosen here. Good luck!

    • They are not dairy per say, but are often clumped into that category when discussing the difference between a vegetarian and a vegan. They often say, A vegan cannot have dairy and they are including eggs.

      Jillee – I appreciate the *dairy free version. vegan mayo cost an arm and a leg!

      THANKS!

      • actually vegans do not eat eggs because they are considered “meat” not dairy…yes in some instances

    • Thanks for pointing that out Kristine! I’ve updated the post title. Like Diane said below I feel like eggs tend to get lumped in with dairy products sometimes so I didn’t even think about it when I posted last night :-)

      • I think they get lumped in when talking about vegan recipes because most people interpret that to mean no dairy as well as no meat but really I think it means no animal products, nothing coming from animals at all and that’s actually how I was interpreting your reason for taking out the eggs. Making it vegan mayo not dairy-less mayo and since the non vegan recipe doesn’t have dairy it’s the eggs that need to go to make it vegan. But I’m also not vegan so maybe the distinction has more significance or importance than I get. Either way thanks for the options Jillee.

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