These Are The Most Effective Ways To Clean Baking Sheets

baking sheets

It’s pretty amazing how quickly baking sheets can lose their brand-new shine and develop that infamous patina of brown, crusty, baked-on grease. And while there’s an argument to be made in favor of having that “well-used” look on your cookware and kitchen tools, baking sheets can easily get to the point where they just look… dirty.

But as most people (including myself) have discovered the hard way, that stubborn layer of grease isn’t easy to remove! It’s impervious to dish soap and water and most other standard cleaning methods, and many people have chosen to simply throw in the towel and say that it’s impossible to truly clean baking sheets.

But I always love a good challenge, especially one that involves solving a tricky cleaning problem! And after hours and hours of research, testing, and scrubbing, I’ve zeroed in on the three best methods for cleaning baking sheets, and I’ll be sharing those here with you today! :-)

baking sheets

A Note About Baking Sheet Materials

This post is written with aluminum baking sheets in mind, and more specifically, raw or bare aluminum baking sheets. If your baking sheets have a non-stick coating (which many aluminized steel baking sheets do), it’s best to stick to gentler cleaners and avoid heavy duty tools like steel wool, which can easily ruin their delicate finish.

And if you’re not really sure which material your pans are made of, make sure to test any method or cleaner on a little patch of the pan first to make sure it won’t damage it.

How To Clean Baking Sheets: The 3 Best Methods

baking sheets

1. Baking Soda And Hydrogen Peroxide

Sprinkle the pan with baking soda to form an even layer. Pour some hydrogen peroxide into a spray bottle (or screw a spray top directly onto the peroxide bottle) and use it to spray enough hydrogen peroxide to wet the baking soda.

Let the ingredients sit on the baking sheet for about two hours. After letting it sit, use a gloved hand or a sponge to scrub the baking sheet, and the baking soda mixture should quickly darken from all the loosened grease.

Rinse the baking soda mixture off of the baking sheet and check your progress on the stains. If it’s not quite clean yet, repeat the cleaning process again to remove the remaining grime.

Why It Works

Baking soda and hydrogen peroxide is one of my all-time favorite cleaning duos. (You can read all about this “miracle cleaner” and the various ways I’ve put it to good use in this post!)

It works equally well for cleaning grimy baking sheets, but I’ve found the most success when I’ve included a third ingredient: time. That baked-on gunk and grime may be stubborn, but giving the combination of baking soda and hydrogen peroxide time to do their thing really minimizes the amount of elbow grease you need to use to remove it!

baking sheets

2. Cream Of Tartar And White Vinegar

Sprinkle cream of tartar evenly across the surface of the baking sheet. Pour some white vinegar into a spray bottle, then add it to the cream of tartar by spraying it with enough vinegar to wet it.

Allow the tartar mixture to dry on the baking sheet for at least eight hours (overnight is perfect.) After the wait, use a bit of hot water and a sponge or scrub brush to scrub the baking sheet thoroughly.

After giving it some elbow grease, rinse the baking sheet with warm water and check your progress, then repeat the process if necessary.

Why It Works

While it may seem strange to sprinkle on cream of tartar as a cleaning ingredient, it’s not so surprising when you consider where it comes from! Cream of tartar is a powdery byproduct of the winemaking process, derived from the tartaric acid present in grapes.

By pairing cream of tartar with an acidic liquid like white vinegar (which contains acetic acid), you form a cleaning paste that can remove tarnish and grease from metals like aluminum, brass, and copper and restore their shine!

(Note: Some people make the mistake of using baking soda instead of cream of tartar in this method. Although mixing baking soda and vinegar will produce a reaction, the reaction is short lived and ultimately won’t be any more effective than soap and water.)

baking sheets

3. Bar Keepers Friend

And finally, there’s good old Bar Keepers Friend. Available as both a scouring powder and a cleaning paste, Bar Keepers Friend often succeeds at removing messes from metal where other cleaners fall short!

After donning a pair of cleaning gloves, simply apply a bit of Bar Keepers Friend to a grimy sheet pan and scrub with a sponge or brush. According to the directions on the container, you’re not supposed to leave this cleaner on a surface for more than a few minutes. The best way I’ve found is to clean smaller sections of the baking sheet one at a time, rinsing each section thoroughly with warm water after scrubbing.

Continue scrubbing your way around the baking sheet until the food stains are gone. Easy!

Why It Works

Bar Keepers Friend is another one of my top cleaners for tough tasks, because very few things work more effectively when it comes to cleaning aluminum, steel, ceramic, copper, and more. The secret to its success (which should come as no surprise at this point) is acid—oxalic acid, in this case.

Oxalic acid, which occurs naturally in plants like rhubarb, spinach, and sorrel, packs more of a punch than tartaric and acetic acids. It breaks down the molecular bonds that make tarnish, rust, and other tough stains so hard to remove, and it leaves behind an impressive shine too!

Because the oxalic acid and other ingredients are so strong, it’s especially important to be careful when using Bar Keepers Friend. Always wear gloves when cleaning with it, keep it away from your face, and be sure to rinse any surfaces it comes in contact with.

Bonus Tips For Keeping Baking Sheets Clean

  • Once you’ve cleaned up your baking sheets and restored their shine, ensure that your hard work doesn’t go to waste by using these tips to keep them clean:
  • When you know whatever you’re going to cook or bake will leave behind a mess, line your sheet pans with aluminum foil before using them. The mess will stay contained to the tin foil, and you can throw it out afterward!
  • Whenever possible, try to hand wash your baking sheets soon after using them. The less time a mess has to sit, the easier it will be to clean.
  • After washing them with soap and water, dry your clean cookie sheets thoroughly to keep bacteria at bay and to avoid rusting.

How do you use your baking sheets at home?

baking sheets

How to Clean Baking Sheets (Step by Step)

Jill Nystul
Ready to make your old baking sheets look like new again? These three cleaning methods will have them sparkling in no time flat.
3.10 from 32 votes
Prep Time 5 minutes
Resting Time: 2 hours
Total Time 2 hours 5 minutes
Cost $5
Yield 1 spotless cookie sheet

Equipment

  • Dirty Baking Sheet

Ingredients
  

  • Baking Soda
  • Hydrogen Peroxide
  • Cream of Tartar
  • White Vinegar
  • Bar Keeper's Friend

Instructions
 

Using Baking Soda And Hydrogen Peroxide

  • Sprinkle the pan with baking soda to form an even layer. Pour some hydrogen peroxide into a spray bottle (or screw a spray top directly onto the peroxide bottle) and use it to spray enough hydrogen peroxide to wet the baking soda.
    Let the ingredients sit on the baking sheet for about two hours. After letting it sit, use a gloved hand or a sponge to scrub the baking sheet, and the baking soda mixture should quickly darken from all the loosened grease.
    Rinse the baking soda mixture off of the baking sheet and check your progress on the stains. If it’s not quite clean yet, repeat the cleaning process again to remove the remaining grime.
    baking sheets

Using Cream Of Tartar And White Vinegar

  • Sprinkle cream of tartar evenly across the surface of the baking sheet. Pour some white vinegar into a spray bottle, then add it to the cream of tartar by spraying it with enough vinegar to wet it.
    Allow the tartar mixture to dry on the baking sheet for at least eight hours (overnight is perfect.) After the wait, use a bit of hot water and a sponge or scrub brush to scrub the baking sheet thoroughly.
    After giving it some elbow grease, rinse the baking sheet with warm water and check your progress, then repeat the process if necessary.
    baking sheets

Using Bar Keeper's Friend

  • And finally, there’s good old Bar Keepers Friend. Available as both a scouring powder and a cleaning paste, Bar Keepers Friend often succeeds at removing messes from metal where other cleaners fall short!
    After donning a pair of cleaning gloves, simply apply a bit of Bar Keepers Friend to a grimy sheet pan and scrub with a sponge or brush. According to the directions on the container, you’re not supposed to leave this cleaner on a surface for more than a few minutes. The best way I’ve found is to clean smaller sections of the baking sheet one at a time, rinsing each section thoroughly with warm water after scrubbing.
    Continue scrubbing your way around the baking sheet until the food stains are gone. Easy!
    baking sheets

Read This Next


Jill Nystul Photo

Jill Nystul (aka Jillee)

Jill Nystul is an accomplished writer and author who founded the blog One Good Thing by Jillee in 2011. With over 30 years of experience in homemaking, she has become a trusted resource for contemporary homemakers by offering practical solutions to everyday household challenges.I share creative homemaking and lifestyle solutions that make your life easier and more enjoyable!

About Jillee

Jill Nystul

Jill’s 30 years of homemaking experience, make her the trusted source for practical household solutions.

About Jillee

MORE IDEAS FROM

Homekeeping Tips

  • This worked great for me. First pan I only let sit for a couple minutes and the second one I let sit longer. Time will definitely make a difference.

  • I desperately need help removing hairspray overspray on bathroom vinyl floor & wooden door. I have steam mop to use on floor.

    I love your blog!!! Great ideas that really work!!!

  • I’m a former Boeing engineer with 40+ years working on aluminum airplanes. A couple of people mentioned they were cleaning their (aluminum) baking pans with Brillo-type pads. Please avoid this if you wish to keep your pans around for years. Use a Scotch-Brite pad instead with light/medium pressure if you need to scrub a baked-on mess.
    Brillo/SOS pads are steel wool. When scrubbed over aluminum, tiny (microscopic) steel fibers embed into the (relatively soft) aluminum and produce rust over time. In addition, steel wool pads easily scratch the aluminum surface. Those small scratches act as miniature ‘grab points’ for all future grime – which makes it even harder to get the surface clean next time around.

    • I’m so disappointed, it didn’t work for me either. I tried 3x over 2 days and it just worked as a mild scrub. I let it sit for hours. Added more baking soda. Added more peroxide… Still nothing.

  • I am returning to update my older comment. I found that I had to repeat this process repeatedly as well as scrubbing very very hard with a chore girl, and a Brillo pad.
    I also had to use a sharp knife to get some grease up and to clean out crevices etc. I also added table salt for more scrubbing action.
    That being said, this process was the only thing that was really helping. ( Other people had baked greasy things on and then not cleaned them properly.)
    I also used this mixture on the outside of other pans and worked it underneath and into crevices where handle attach to pan, and it worked fine.
    A GREAT added bonus that I tried on red stains that ended up on my counters from…whatever. It worked WONDERFULLY well! Nothing else had ever worked, so NICE!
    I think that my grease must have been baked on my pans more than yours Jille,
    Thanks so much, Jille. I share your words ow wisdom frequently!

  • Ok, I gotta say, SOS pads make quick work with just a little scrubbing. I cut my SOS/Brillo pads in half, as not much is required. And you know immediately if you missed spots, not later. My cookie sheets are shiny! But I love most of Jillee’s other ideas:)

  • I tried this and found that it worked on some spots but not by putting it on and waiting a few hours. At the end of two hours some areas were cleaned with much work and scrubbing. So put products back on and left over night. Again it got some better with hard scrubbing. Glad some found it to be as effective as reported. Perhaps the pans were newer and not as challenging. Overall very time consuming and lots of scrubbing. Not that effective.

    • People use hydrogen peroxide on wounds and some even use it as a mouthwash (spitting it out of course) and baking Sosa is in plenty of good recipes. I mean wash it off, but it is definitely food safe.

  • I’ll have to try this but when I clean my cast iron I put my baking sheet one the bottom to to catch the drippings, would this method work with the oil spots?

    • I decided to clean my stove top with this method last night. Worked great. You have to wipe clean a lot to get rid of the baking soda residue. No biggie! I then decided to try on a couple of big spills in my oven. Left it for about 4 hours. It was dry so I spritzed with a bit more peroxide. Wiped it all up with paper towels then used a damp rag to finish. Clean as a whistle!!

      • The baking soda is chemically a weak base. If you wipe it up with a weak vinegar solution (weak acid) it should neutralize it and wash it away quickly. I used to use the horrible oven cleaners, then rinse that mess with vinegar to speed up the clean-up from the cleaner.

  • Thanks for the ” recipe!” I knew I’d heard about a combination that worked but couldn’t remember what it was! Now if you could post the “home remedies” for weed killers and ice melting, I’d know you were a miracle worker!
    Just kidding….you ARE a miracle worker! Thanks again!

    • White vinegar works great to kills weeds. You can mix vinegar, water and a few drops of dish soap to spray on weeds or squirt pour full strength on a sunny day. Works great on driveways and sidewalk cracks. I use full strength in the morning so it has the day’s sun and heat to process. Works just like the commercial weed killers, but is safe to use and cheaper. Don’t have to worry about pets or spray residue. CAUTION! It will kill other plants it touches. Will also prevent other plants from growing where poured until acidity weakens.

  • On my gosh! I have been so frustrated by this exact gunky problem. I don’t have a dishwasher (by choice), so trying to keep my stainless cooking sheets and pan bottoms “buildup, yuck-free” has been a pain. Everyone in my family loves to cook, so you can imagine the amount of use our kitchenware goes through daily!
    I’ve tried baking soda and vinegar, baking soda and lemons…
    I have Multiple Sclerosis and it’s definitely a challenge to scrub for a long time. Especially on one pot bottom or pan. Ugh!
    Thank you so very much for this post! I’m absolutely going to give your recipe a try! I’m super excited about this!

    • I must add, we don’t use ANYTHING with harsh toxic ingredients – from cleaners, soaps, fragrances to makeup…none. So, this is why I’m excited about this post today!

  • Thank you for this post today. I have several pans that look like the one you cleaned up. It’s so great to use safe cleaners to accomplish a much needed result! I wonder if this would work on Pyrex? I’ll try it.

  • thank you for all your awesome, informative posts. I have a question, would you happen to know if this cleaner and procedure would work on cast iron by chance? I have 3 cast iron skillets that I love, but they are all getting rather grungy and I do need to get them scrubbed up and reseason. Thank you for any help you can offer! Love your entire site!

  • Thank you! I have a few “stainless steel” skillets that are not so stainless on the bottom anymore. Ithink I will try this mixture to these pans as I hate to see the bottoms.

  • I put my pan in a trash bag with a small dish (1/2 cup) of ammonia. Tie the bag shut, let it set overnight & in the morning….viola! All that gunk just wipes right off! Works on electric skillets too!

  • I bake all the time so I hate scummy pans.. I put my baking sheets in the oven when I self clean and they come out clean as a whistle. Love this for small spots though. Love your blog. You are wonderful

  • Jillee,
    When we moved into this house almost seven years ago, the former owners took pretty good care of it thankfully. However, the bathtub looks like it may have been painted or coated with a white whatever not sure what it is. When I clean the tub, the material peels off onto your hands and sponge/rag whatever I use for cleaning leaving white flecks on them. I can’t afford bathfitters and the like. Any ideas for fixing the surface of the tub and it stains easy too.
    Thanks for any ideas.

  • This is a hoax and was plagerized. I pinned the other one. It was the most re pinned from all my pins. I’m telling you HUNDREDS of repins. I decided to try it. NOTHING happened. I tried again. Same result. I deleted it. Used to follow Jillee. No longer.

  • Industrial pans like the one you cleaned can just be left in the oven when you put the oven on self clean. I do it all the time, they come out like new.

  • I drop a comment whenever I especially enjoy a article on a website or I
    have something to contribute to the discussion. Usually
    it’s a result of the sincerness communicated in the article I read.

    And on this post New Life For Old Cookie Sheets .
    . . Again. | One Good Thing by Jillee. I was actually excited enough to post a thought :-P I do have a couple of questions for you if you do not mind.
    Is it just me or does it appear like a few of the comments appear as if they are
    coming from brain dead individuals? :-P And, if you are posting at additional sites, I would like to follow anything fresh
    you have to post. Could you list all of your public sites
    like your twitter feed, Facebook page or linkedin profile?

  • Excellent web site you have here.. It’s hard to find good quality writing
    like yours nowadays. I truly appreciate individuals like you!

    Take care!!

  • This isn’t homemade, but I spray my baking sheets with EZ Off oven cleaner, put them in the oven at 250 degrees for 20 minutes, then just rinse off the gunk, and voila! Clean.

  • I want to to thank you for this wonderful read!! I definitely
    loved every bit of it. I’ve got you bookmarked to check out new stuff you post…

  • […] cookie sheets: https://onegoodthingbyjillee.com/2012/05/new-life-for-old-cookie-sheets-again.html […]

  • I think miracle is a bit of an oversell. It kind of worked but I had to scrub a LOT. I’m happy that it got some of the funk off, but it was definitely more work than this post implies.

  • A friend buys a mouth guard and fills it with baking soda and peroxide during his shower. His hygienist compliments him on how white his teeth are and stronger gums.

  • I hate to resurrect such an old post, but I came across this today and decided to try the “Miracle Cleaner + Time” formula on my glass top stove, and I just have to tell you it worked WONDERFULLY. I only had to push (I hesitate to say scrub or use elbow grease because it wasn’t really either) a little on the worst of the offending spots to get them removed. Thank you for sharing the “Miracle Cleaner.”

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  • […] peroxide. Laying the two on a pan and letting it sit will do wonders! Check out the how to over at One Good Thing By Jillee blog. THIS WORKS  FOR CERAMIC STAINS AS WELL! – Like rings in a tub or toilet. Just be sure […]

  • Hi. Tried this and it hardly made a dent in the gunk. Will try again, but not sure what to do differently. I made the paste using a lot of baking soda and HP and then I left it overnight and just a tiny bit came off. Nothing like your picture.

  • If baking soda & baking powder are old or have been sitting on the store shelves for too long they won’t interact with the peroxide/vinegar. I always try to grab the boxes at the back of the shelf because if they were stocked properly the oldest products are at the front of the shelf.

  • I have tried twice, on the same cookie sheet. Both times I let it sit for 8+ hrs, and had No luck with this “miracle cleaner”. the 1st time I just let it sit over night then cleaned and scrub it in the morning. The 2nd time I started in the morning and about every 2hrs I would go in and scrub the sheet a little pack all the “miracle cleaner” back down and into palce. And still nothing. I fell like it was a waist of time.

  • HP is wonderful for removing blood stains, before my dad passed away he had a lot of nose bleeds, hydrogen peroxide always took the blood out of his clothes! Awesome stuff!

  • […] recently stumbled upon this tutorial about EASILY cleaning your cookie sheets via One Good […]

  • […] care products! Ever since I started using Hydrogen Peroxide to get rid of armpit stains, to clean cookie sheets, as a miracle cleaner in my kitchen and bathroom, and to make my own “oxi […]

  • […] since I started using Hydrogen Peroxide to get rid of armpit stains, to clean cookie sheets, as a miracle cleaner in my kitchen and bathroom, and to make my own “oxi […]

  • […] Remove baked-on crud from pots and pans. Combine hydrogen peroxide with enough baking soda to make a paste, then rub onto the dirty pan and let it sit for a while. Come back later with a scrubby sponge and some warm water, and the baked-on stains will lift right off. […]

  • I made apple butter last week and it boiled over in my crock. I’m trying this on the inside of where the crock sits and I can’t put water to see if it will help. Using the +time method! Took pics of the before and with the paste on it. Had to make a paste instead of sprinkle and spritz because of the sides. If it doesn’t work I’ll go get some fresh peroxide before giving up. This one has been around a bit.

  • An impressive share! I have just forwarded this onto a coworker who had
    been conducting a little homework on this. And he actually ordered me breakfqst because I found it for
    him… lol. So allow me to reword this…. Thanks for the meal!!

    But yeah, thanks forr spending time to talk about this matter here on yoiur blog.

  • […] since I started using Hydrogen Peroxide to get rid of armpit stains, to clean cookie sheets, as a miracle cleaner in my kitchen and bathroom, and to make my own “oxi clean”…I ALWAYS […]

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  • I recently purchased an old foley food mill at a flea market. Would your concoction be good for cleaning that or do you have a better recommendation for cleaning old metal pots that are not stainless steel?

  • […] I saw this link on Pinterest:  New Life for Old Cookie Sheets, I was intrigued.  Ryan and I own a really old cookie sheet that has tons of gunk on it that […]

  • […] Remove baked-on crud from pots and pans. Combine hydrogen peroxide with enough baking soda to make a paste, then rub onto the dirty pan and let it sit for a while. Come back later with a scrubby sponge and some warm water, and the baked-on stains will lift right off. […]

  • Baking Soda and Hydrogen Peroxide to Clean Cookie Sheets ? | Welcome to Memes Coupons and Deals says:

    […] ran across this DIY: Make your Cookie Sheets New Again with Baking Soda and Peroxide and Time, to clean them. This will save us time and money on […]

  • 1 used baking soda and hydrogen peroxide to remove the most terrible stains on a hardwood floor of a home we just bought- a cat was living under the previous owner’s bed and must have left 20 years worth of urine stains that seeped onto the hardwood floor. the smell was so terrible you couldn’t even go upstairs. All it took was an entire bottle of hydrogen peroxide and 2 tablespoons of baking soda-I used a sponge mop and mopped the room with this solution, leaving some of the solution overnight on the worst part of the stain. the smell is GONE!! truly the best combination of cleaning products ever.

  • […] since I started using Hydrogen Peroxide to get rid of armpit stains, to clean cookie sheets, as a miracle cleaner in my kitchen and bathroom, and to make my own “oxi […]

  • […] out how here to Make Your Cookie Sheets New Again with Baking Soda and Peroxide! This is an easy DIY that you can do at home one evening, and it […]

  • You had a substitute for SHOUT.
    i can’gt find it. Could you repeat it or tell me where I could find it.
    It had ammonia and Dawn and something else.
    Thanks

  • […] do it yourself trick has two sides to it.  Over at One Good Thing by Jillee, she shares this trick with hydrogen peroxide and baking soda to clean the brown gunk off of pans. […]

  • […] is that it used the same ingredients as all the other cleaning agent that I found online. The blog One Good Thing by Jillee  used baking soda and hydrogen […]

  • I just want to suggest that when we refer to “peroxide” or “hydrogen peroxide” around here that we typically mean, and should say, “hydrogen peroxide 3%” or “hydrogen peroxide 3% solution”. If you look at the bottle that you buy at your pharmacy, over-the-counter, it’ll probably be the 3% solution. That is, it contains only 3% hydrogen peroxide and 97% purified water. This is important because it is possible to buy, for use in the home, or commercially, solutions with much more peroxide; 35% is still considered “food grade”, for example, but it is also corrosive. This could really help prevent some dangerous mistakes by some with lesser experience and understanding. Thx

  • […] must work for some people though?  Over at One Good Thing by Jillee, she did exactly the same thing, except her cookie sheets actually came out super clean.  So maybe […]

  • I tried this technique on my cookie sheets and left it on for at least 8 hrs and nothing happened. I sprinkled on the soda, sprinkled on peroxide and then sprinkled on more baking soda. Nothing. Are you sure there’s not an added step?

  • […] out the grime and make the cookie sheet like new I became interested. After reading the blog at One Good Thing by Jillee I immediately wanted to try it out. Best of all I already had the ingredients for the cleaning […]

  • […] all of my baking pans are used, and crusted with gunk from using them on a regular basis.  “One Good Thing by Jillee” shares how to de-gunk those baking pans with baking soda and peroxide.. hello?!  How darn […]

  • This does not work at all. Soaked over night didn’t touch stain.So in Am I threw it into my self cleaning oven without any chemicals worked perfect and cleaned all the burn stuff off cookie sheet completely Oven was clean as well.

  • I tried this trick on one of my baking sheets yesterday. I must admit mine was much worse than the ones in your pics. I apparently need more patience though. I covered half the sheet in “Miracle Cleaner” (I also wanted to test it out first) and waited 30 mins. (My curiosity got the better of me) Then I took a nail brush that I use for cleaning and scrubbed. It got some of the layered on gunk off but needs another shot of it and more time. lol I have such a hard time being patient when it comes to this stuff. lol Part of being a Gemini I suppose, on one hand part of me knows that I should wait, the other part of me is just too darn curious. lol

  • Didn’t work on mine at all. I believe they are far to gone I’ll just continue doing what I’ve been doing until I can afford to get nice ones to replace them with. I just lay down some tinfoil. I don’t like to use so much foil but its better than having my food on my ugly pans. Then I’ll try this to keep up with them after I get the new ones.

  • […] I wanted to see if they stood up to the test. I found this pin connecting to an article at One Good Thing by Jillee. I was excited because I have a cookie sheet that has turned into a mess. I reserved this for messy […]

  • […] 3. I tried to clean our blackened drip pans from the stove using baking soda.  I also tried mixing it with water and cascade.  None of them worked.  Next time I’m thinking of trying this tip from One Good Thing by Jillee. […]

  • A note to you out there trying this with the peroxide: peroxide degrades when exposed to light. It is essentially water with an extra oxygen particle (instead of h20, it’s h202). When exposed to light for a period of time, it eventually just becomes water. So perhaps sticking the pans somewhere dark (like your oven) will help the process. I love this cleaner for laundry as well. If you want to get rid of old pit stains on your shirts, make a paste of baking soda and peroxide. Put the garment somewhere dark for about 20 minutes and wash it out. If it’s not all gone, it will be mostly gone. Try not to use old peroxide for better results. Old baking soda will still clean just as well.

  • Using Baking Soda and Hydrogen Peroxide To Easily Clean Baking Sheets Review – Does it Work? | Green Idea Reviews says:

    […] had sprinkled baking soda and peroxide on her yucky baking sheets, waited an hour or two, and then easily wiped away the grime.  Look at how promising this photo is! This is what I was looking forward to. Photo by […]

  • A nurse told me a little trick for peroxide a few years back. Just put a little on blood before washing . Works like a charm. I keep some in a spray bottle by the washer.

    • Yes, i use peroxide in laundry all the time. NOTHING is better for blood stains. If i have a grungy load, sometimes, i’ll just pour a whole bottle of peroxide in the washer with everything else. It helps my laundry come out shiny.

  • I really really want to try this, but is it safe to use on nonstick pans too? I have a cookie sheet my mother gave me that’s got a bunch of baked on grease, but I’ve scrubbed and scrubbed with no luck. :(

  • I have 50% Peroxide. It burned my hands just to get it out of the car and into the house. How do you dilute it to get 3% that’s needed in the recipe?

  • What Will work on non stick in most cases is a citrus-pumice based hand cleaner. I like the orange one. Smear it all over and leave it even over night then just wash off. Even if you feel you MUST rub it won’t harm you non stick surface. I’ve used it in my cleaning business for years.

  • […] since I started using Hydrogen Peroxide to get rid of armpit stains, to clean cookie sheets, as a miracle cleaner in my kitchen and bathroom, and to make my own “oxi […]

  • Can’t wait to try this. I have another tip for you. My city water leaves an orange film on my fiberglass shower walls. My grandmother suggested using fumeless oven cleaner. Spray it on, leave for five minutes, scrub lightly with a stiff brush and rinse. It was so simple and my shower looks brand new. It even took the spots off the floor the bleach always misses.

  • […] more challenging with each new casserole or dessert that we make. Although one greatly celebrated chemical-free cleansing recipe promises to restore metal kitchenware to its former glory with nothing more than the magical duo of […]

  • I use something similar to clean the sticky goo left from a sticker on a metal surface and also for cleaning my stainless tea kettle. Make a paste of baking soda and Dawn dish soap. Rub paste with your finger or with an old tooth brush for stubborn stain. Makes any dirty stainless steel item brand spanking new.

  • I have two things I use for this. One requires a pan big enough to immerse the grungy one in. Put the grungy one in the bigger pan, add enough water to completely cover it plus another inch or so. Cook it in the oven for 30-60 minutes, depending on how grungy it is. Take it out carefully so you don’t burn yourself or spill the hot water. Rinse both pans off in hot water. That should do it, but repeat if necessary. I use foil disposable turkey baking pans for the biggest things, like iron skillets. I rinse out the foil pan and keep it though. This will clean an ancient crusty, rusty, nasty second-hand iron skillet with ease. Wash and dry iron immediately and re-season it as soon as possible afterwards.

    Method #2 – Not nearly as green as the first or yours. Dawn makes a gel that comes in a spray bottle. It works great, although it may take more than once if the pan is really nasty. I use this for things with wooden or plastic handles that I can’t “bake” in the oven. It does wonders for my metal mesh splatter screen I use when I fry things.

    Solution for nasty drip pans~~ get one of those silicon pads made for lining the bottom of a stove or microwave, line the pan with it. It would be easier to just get a new cookie sheet and save the old one as a permanent drip pan. Then it wouldn’t matter what it looked like.

  • Do I use this on both sides of the cookie sheet? I am not worried about the bottom on the outside I am more worried about the cooking side.

    • i use this method on my flat top, sprinkle baking soda, a spray of vinegar and and spray of peroxcide and then place a damp dish rag and leave for a while so it can pentrate then wipe up

    • I just tried it yesterday, it worked beautifully. I let it sit for about 4 hrs. Most of it came right off. Only one burner didn’t come off as easy but with a little scrubbing it cleaned out pretty good. I’m definitely cleaning them again this way.

  • […] is another one making the rounds about using baking soda and peroxide to clean your cookie sheets.  I tried that one too but I didn’t follow the directions exactly.  It worked okay, […]

  • […] New Life For Old Cookie Sheets @ One Good Thing By Jillee.  Getting rid of that weird brown build-up using natural ingredients you already have in your home.  I have some cookie sheets that would be great candidates for this idea. […]

  • I was disappointed with the results, but I used old baking soda. I am going to retry with a fresh box and put the old one in the fridge. I still have hope>

  • […] New Life For Old Cookie Sheets @ One Good Thing – a quick and natural solution for cleaning off those grimy cooking sheets […]

  • I wonder if this works on silicone pans. I’ve a muffin pan that is dreadfully hard to clean and it is all black and stained. I am going to try it. Certainly can’t hurt it!

  • I’m not sure if I did something wrong, but I like Debby J let them soak all night and nothing came off. I poured on the peroxide and put on a lot of baking soda… Any suggestions on what will help would be greatly appreciated!

      • Unfortunately SOME cookies sheets are just too far gone. I have some like that. I just cover them with foil when I use them and they look shiny new! ;-)

      • When I use foil, it retards the baking process and leaves stuff underbaked on the bottom. Anyway, the peroxide and baking soda didnt work for me either. :(

      • If the baking soda and peroxide method isn’t working for you, you could try ammonia. I use it on my gas range grates and it works beautifully. Just put them in a large trash back with a few table spoons worth of ammonia and let them sit (outside to avoid fumes) over night. The fumes actually soften the gunk so that it wipes right off with minimal scrubbing. :)

      • Ammonia was my mom’s secret for cleaning anything greasy & cooked on. She even throws the oven shelves & outdoor grill stuff in a sealed trash bag with the ammonia and it works beautifully!

    • There’s an all natural liquid soap that I use for the toughest baked on grease. It works on old and baked on grease. I use it to clean ovens, too. It has to be diluted with water as it is very concentrated.

      It is so natural that some people take it internally to use it as a cleanse to rid their body of parasites.

      It may seem expensive but, for example, it costs less than a cannister of oven cleaner. It costs less than $1 an ounce. I use 2 ounces in a spray bottle with about 8 ounces of water. I warm up my oven to just a bit warmer than warm but not real hot. I shut it off and I spray the soap solution inside the oven and on the racks. I shut the door and leave it overnight. The next day, I just wipe everything with a wet cloth.

      This soap is great for bubbles in baths too. It draws toxins out of the body. You never will have to clean the tub again. It leaves everything shining. You only use 1 or 2 ounces in the bath so the cost can be under $1 if you use 1 ounce per bath.

      Here’s the website if you want to check it out….
      http://www.myrezealiant.com/SlimEnergyFoods

      If you want to know other uses for this soap and how much to use for various jobs, send me an email and I’ll try to find them for you.

  • I tried your method for cleaning baking sheets. Perhaps mine were too far gone, but it did not work. I left them “soak” overnight and still nothing. Guess I will just have to leave them for the drip pans and use new ones.

  • I’m hooked. My granddaughter introduced me to Pintrist and I love it! I keyed into this one to see if someone could tell me how to restore my Calphalon cookie – I clean them thoroughly, but used parchment paper to bake bread & wound up with a sticky, greasy film in the middle of the pans. Don’t know what happened – love the bread, hate the messed-up cookie sheet. I’ll try the baking soda-ammonia idea, and maybe the ketchup one, too! Thanks to all of you for brightening my day! And Sara, if you see this, thanks again! Love you!

  • Thank u so much! Im hoping u just saved me many $$$ by not having to replace my pans!! Granted i have had them for like 7 years, but as someone that wud rather spend money on crafts… Love this!! Thanks again!

  • My kitchen counter tops are white tile with what used to be white grout. I put the baking soda and peroxide paste on the grout and waited a few hours. Well this worked, the grout is now white with just a small amount of scrubbing on my part. Thanks

  • I have for years used hydrogen peroxide and ammonia (equal amounts in a spray bottle) it is an amazing stain remover and I have never had a problem with fading my fabrics or anything. It is amazing on grease spots and food stains. I also put baking soda in my wash and use baking soda all over my kitchen but for some reason have never thought to mix baking soda and peroxide. Thanks for the tip and I LOVE the pics.

  • I have several half-jelly roll pans that have multiple uses; my husband snags them occasionally and uses them as drips pans under the grill (don’t get me started) when he does ribs or smokes butts. They are nearly impossible to clean-up – I learned that you can put them in the oven and run them through a self-clean cycle and they come out looking nearly brand new. This WILL NOT work on non-stick pans and they never cook as good as they did when new; so I keep them separate from my “good” ones and always make sure to put parchment or silicone on them if I need to use them!

  • Not long after I read this, someone left a grimy toaster oven on the “giveaway” table in my office. It looked disgusting. I took it home and tried the “miracle cleaning” formula. I didn’t even have to wait an hour to see how well this stuff just lifted the grease and grime right off the oven door. I plastered this stuff all over the oven – inside and out. It doesn’t even look like the same junk toaster no one wanted. Now I have a “like new” 6 slice Bella Kitchen convection toaster oven for free!

  • Every year I replace fishing lures because they dull, stain etc. I just tried your miracle cleaner and saved a ton of money with newly refreshed lures. It makes the spinners shine, and removed the unknown gunk that seems to build up mysteriously. I had one white hair jig that was headed for the trash because the hair and threads were so stained with rust. I used the +time method and the jig is back to white as new. Thanks.

  • I have a bunch of non-stick pots that need this. I don’t have to scrub the inside, since they’re non-stick, but now the outsides have gotten bad because I don’t spend time cleaning them. I’ll definitely do a test spot first, though.

  • I am going to try this on the back of my good Pampered Chef professional cookware that my hubby uses. Needless to say I have given up trying to keep the back of egg/saute pan clean. LOL I’ll let you know how it works.

  • My husband wants to thank you for all of your cleaning tips. I read your blog daily, and then when
    there is a new tip I’m like you and go “I have to try that.” Needless to say, our house is a lot cleaner than it was before. He’s very OCD about cleanliness( I’m more of a chaotic type) so he’s a lot less stressed now. Thanks Jillee!

  • I must say I am thoroughly impressed with this site regularly! I go home with a new cleaning experiment or homemade cleaner recipe and I am so excited, and the best part the results are always amazing! Thank so much for all your hard work, it truly has made me a happy camper and my house sparkles and shines much longer between cleanings:)

  • You must have been reading my mind. I have the brown build up around the edges and on the backs of my pans too, and I was just wondering yesterday what would take that off without a ton of scrubbing. I love all of your tips and tricks and read your blog daily and I “pin” most of your posts. Keep them coming!

  • My stepdad manages rental property and so he does a lot of cleaning of really terrible things. He says that the mistake most people make is assuming that they have to do the work. You should find a good cleaner for the job you need to do and then get it on there and go away. Let it do it’s work. Sometimes, you’ll still have a little scrubbing to do, but nothing like if you just started scrubbing right away.

    Which is one of the reasons why he’s so interested in my new homemade cleaners, because with the storebought stuff, you’re walking a thin line between giving it the time it needs and letting the harsh chemicals eat away at the surface.

  • I think I’m going to try this on the underside of my pots and pans, too. They’re just as good with the gunk on them but I want them shiny and pretty again!

  • I love this blog! Little tips like this give me a reason to go buy stuff like Peroxide. Sure, I should already have some in my house for my first aid kit, but then it never gets used and I end up throwing away full bottles that have been expired for 4 years… Now I have a use for it other than expiring in my first aid kit.

    • Using hydrogen peroxide to clean out wounds, scrapes and cuts kills the good cells as well as the bad cells in your body. Just use some simple soap and water. Your cut will heal faster and with less scaring.

      • You can use Hydrogen Peroxide to clean wounds and infected areas but after the HP needs to be rinsed, use sterile water. it will stop the process of the HP killing the good stuff.

    • Don’t get too excited ladies and gents! This does not work.It didn’t work for me and check out many many other posts it didn’t work for.

      • Your exactly right got so excited to try it went out and bought the stuff for it put it on waited over 2hrs then took it off and it looked exactly how it first started out nothing happened not something I would try again

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